Cleveland State University Polish Studies

http://www.csuohio.edu/class/polishstudies/

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Mikolaj Kunicki, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Department of History University of Notre Dame “How communist was Polish communism? Nationalism and communism in 20th-century Poland.”

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Edward Horowitz, Ph.D.  Associate Professor, School of Communication, and Director of the Polish Studies Initiative Cleveland State University “Running strong or running scared? How the worldwide economic crisis is affecting Polish young adults.”

Discover Polish Easter Tradition of Palm Weaving

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Discover Polish Easter Tradition of Palm Weaving

with Ray Vargas

Saturday, March 23, 2013; 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Polish American Cultural Center

6501 Lansing Avenue, Cleveland, OH

Fee $8.00 (includes supplies)

Call to reserve your seat  / Contact Carol Stafinski at 440.942.4427

Deadline for reservations is Thursday, March 21, 2013

Sponsored by Ohio Chapter The Kosciuszko Foundation

with the co-operation of the Polish American Cultural Center

Wigilia

You are cordially invited to attend Polish Wigilia to be held on Sunday December 16, 20012 at the Polish American Cultural Center on Lansing Avenue. The dinner will start at 12:30 PM with breaking of opłatek followed by a traditional meatless dinner. After dinner special program about Polish Christmas traditions.

The cost of the dinner is $20 for adults and $10 for children under 12.

We hope you can attend. Please make reservation early since we expect a sell out.

Polish Lectures at Cleveland State University

 

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Joanna Trzeciak, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies,

Kent State University

 

Reaching for Readers: Polish Poetry and the Moral Economy of Translation

All Lectures Begin at 4:00 PM in CSU Student Center, Room 315.

For more information visit www.csuohio.edu/class/polishstudies

NORMA

by Vincenzo Bellini

  • Friday, November 16, 2012 at 7:30 pm
  • Sunday, November 18, 2012 at 3 pm
First Baptist Church of Greater Cleveland(corner of Fairmount & Eaton)3630 Fairmount Blvd.Shaker Heights OH 44118
More: Opera Circle

October 29th: The Śląsk Polish Song and Dance Ensemble

Monday, October 29 at8 PM in Garfield Heights High School,
4900 Turney Road, Garfield Heights, OH 44125

ŚLĄSK SONG AND DANCE ENSEMBLE OF POLAND
One of the Grandest and Most Dazzling Spectacles in the World.

60th Anniversary Tour.
The Śląsk Polish Song and Dance Ensemble have been described as one of the grandest and most dazzling spectacles in the world. The show is a thrilling display of dazzling movement, vibrant colour and stunning beauty, with beautiful choreographic, vocal and musical performances. The incomparable Śląsk performance troupe whirls, leaps, stamps and glides in a glorious outpouring of sound, motion, rhythm and music that celebrates the cultural legacy of Poland. Tickets: $40 available in: PACC, Cosmopolitan Agency, Chalasinski Insurance, Ameripol, Kraków Deli, Seven Roses

November 11th Polish Independence Day Reception

All are welcome. Reception starts at 2 PM.

More info about Polish Independence Day

Study-Abroad Courses at MSASS in 2013

Poland: SASS 375/575 – Invisible Groups in a New Poland

Place: Poznan, Poland – Check out our latest photo album!

Poland, once a major European power from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea, was invaded in the eighteenth century by the Russian, Prussian and Austrian empires. The country disappeared from the map of Europe. Poznan, often called the first capital of Poland, became part of Prussia and later, Germany. A center of Polish culture and national identity, Poznan is a dynamic city with a rich multicultural past.
We will arrive in Berlin and travel to Poznan by train. Here are a few websites with details about the city we will be visiting:

Poznan – WordPress blog

Poznan – Virtual Tourist

Polish Online Forum

Goal

We will introduce students to Polish culture and social policies and practices that address disenfranchised, stigmatized and disempowered social groups. The course will encourage students to understand how Poland’s recent political and economic transformation has affected society in general and, especially, marginalized groups. The course will focus on how Polish society addresses problems of poverty, homelessness, aging, domestic violence and mental health disorders.

Travel Considerations

The weather will be similar to late winter/early spring in Cleveland. Poznan is a typical Polish city. The streets are filled with pedestrians making their way to work, shops, restaurants, cafes and clubs. Public transportation is excellent, but you will be able to walk to many destinations. Choose comfortable, warm, water-resistant shoes.

Hotel

Students will be housed in double rooms in the “Jowita” student dormitory near the Adam Mickiewicz University.

What to Bring

If you plan on using any electrical equipment in Poland, you will need a power converter (from 220V to 110V).

Food

Breakfast and lunch will be available in “Jowita.” Dinner will be based on our evening plans.

Money

A dinner at a nice restaurant on your own will cost anywhere from $15 to $50, but you will find many cheaper casual cafes and restaurants with very good food. Every $1 = about 3 Polish zloty (read: zwoty).

Program Schedule

Our program was designed in cooperation with the Institute of Sociology at the University of Poznan. See the following websites for more information:

Adam Mickiewicz University

Wydzial Nauk Spolecznych

Itinerary (subject to change)

Saturday, March 10 – Arrive in Berlin and take train to Poznan in the evening

Sunday, March 11 – Poznan sightseeing and class orientation

Monday-Thursday, March 12-15 – Lectures and workshops / department of sociology

Friday-Saturday, March 16 and 17 – Sightseeing in Poznan and vicinity

Lectures and Workshops

  • Mobility: Social and spatial aspects of mobility
  • Family and socio-cultural conditions of mental disorders – analysis from a gender perspective
  • Research on homelessness as an example of social marginalization
  • Lecture and discussion on Poles and homosexuality – the evolution of attitudes
  • Cultural differences in communication
  • The main social problems in Poland
  • Social conditions of marginalization and exclusion in Poland
  • Note: There also will be special workshops concerning substance abuse and mental health problems prepared by MSASS faculty and students, especially for Polish students.

Meetings and Visits in Social Work Institutions

Other Meetings and Visits

  • Agnieszka Kozlowska-Rajewicz, member of the Sejm (Parliament) Commission on Social Affairs; member of the Commission on Youth Affairs; and member of the Commission on Health
  • Elzbieta Dybowska, coordinator of the city program for substance abuse prevention
  • Vice-President of the City of Poznan
  • Dean of the Division of Social Sciences at Adam Mickiewicz University
  • Director of the Institute of Sociology
  • Meeting with fellows of the Lane Kirkland Foundation scholarship

In addition to a rich academic program, students will be able to attend different cultural events and will be meeting with many international students from the Lane Kirkland Foundation. Translators will also assist us during our time in Poland.

 

“La serva padrona” by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi

Introductory Note

—from Dorota & Wanda

This weekend, Opera Circle is thrilled to present the chamber opera “La serva padrona” by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi.

While it originated as a two-part intermezzo presented inbetween the acts of a longer, more serious work, this brilliant comedy has become acknowledged as a staple in the operatic repertoire in its own right. For those of you not familiar with the plot, you may wish to read the story here.

The significance of “La serva padrona” does not, in fact, end with the operatic repertoire, however; it went on to become wildly popular in Europe, and a 1752 performance in Paris sparked the famous “Querelle des Bouffons”(Quarrel of the Comic Actors), which challenged the contemporary society, through a comparison of the Italian and French styles, to reconsider the accepted mode of aesthetic perception.

With such an illustrious career under its belt, the work has also enjoyed a wealth of historical recordings from the Golden Age of the LP industry, including renditions performed by such stars as Renata Scotto, Anna Moffo, and the Belgian ensemble “La Petite Bande.” And with its fantastic music, this comes as no surprise.

With this much history behind it, it is perhaps ironic that this unassuming intermezzo revolves neither around kings nor queens nor historical conflicts, but just about ordinary folks doing everyday things [*]: getting through life, falling in love, and… even admitting it to themselves.

That said, come join us; we look forward to seeing you!

Dorota, Wanda, & The Opera Circle Crew

[*]: Kudos to Board member Elliott Schultz for his keen observation on this score!

P.S. All performances—June 22, 23, & 24—are free admission. Visit the website for details.

American Students in Poznań

               The Institute of Sociology at Adam Mickiewicz University and the Center for Youth Vocational Guidance in Poznań recently hosted guests from the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University. Eleven students and two instructors, Drs. Kathleen Farkas and Richard Romaniuk, visited the city from March 10th to March 17th.

Their trip was one of the results of Bogna Frąszczak’s visit to Cleveland in 2008 as part of the International Visitor Leadership Program organized by the United States Department of State. During her visit at the Polish-American Cultural Center, she met Dr. Romaniuk, and the two decided to organize a student exchange. After three years of negotiations and two visits by Dr. Romaniuk to the Department of Social Work at the Institute of Sociology directed by Dr. Anna Michalska, the visit of the CWRU students was organized, as the start of what is to be a cooperative relationship between the two universities. Cultural Attaché Andrew Paul of the United States Embassy in Poland and Krzysztof Podemski, Dean of Social Sciences at Adam Mickiewicz University, participated in the inaugural ceremony marking this cooperation. Paul accompanied the students and guests at a meeting with high school graduates in Poznań thinking of continuing their studies in the United States. During this meeting at the Center for Youth Vocational Guidance, the students from Cleveland presented the advantages and disadvantages of American higher education and shared their practical knowledge of studying in different academic fields at universities throughout the United States.

At Adam Mickiewicz University the CWRU students participated in seven lectures given by sociologists from Poznań and in a Polish-American symposium dedicated to the exchange of experiences in the area of solving social problems. The symposium included a presentation of evidence-based practices in social policy. The academic part of the students’ visit also included field trips to social service agencies in Poznań, such as the Association of Social Emergency, a center for the homeless; the Wielkopolska Center for Mutual Aid sponsored by the MONAR Society, a non-governmental organization that aids the homeless and those with AIDS and problems of addiction; and the “Center” Center for Community Action. The students also met with city officials such as Elżbieta Dybowska, Vice-Director of the Division of Health and Social Affairs, and Michał Kaczmarek, representing the “Academic Poznań” group. Dybowska presented the principles behind community programs meant to address problems of drug and alcohol addiction.

Such an active academic program did not allow for too many cultural offerings, but the students did visit Poznań and the local area as much as possible. They attended a performance of the show Magistryton in the “U Przyjaciół” Theater and visited Ostrów Tumski, one of the city’s most important neighborhoods, the Old Town, and the June 1956 Museum and the National Museum. In the Arkady Fiedler Muzeum in Puszczyków, they met with Krystyna Fiedler, the leader of the program, „Leaders of the Polish-American Foundation of Liberty”.

The CWRU students also met with students in social work from Adam Mickiewicz University and scholarship students from the Lane Kirkland Program. These meetings offered the young students from different cultures a chance to discuss their views and different life experiences. The Lane Kirkland students had the chance to present information about the countries they call home, while the students from Poznań and Cleveland shared information about their experiences as students and young adults.

 

Bogna and Ksenia Frąszczak