Posts Tagged ‘Polish’

“Polonia in Cleveland and the Journey of Julian Stanczak”

Friday, February 28th, 2014

Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 2:00 – 4:00 PM
Western Reserve Historical Society

 

As part of the series of events celebrating the life and work of Julian Stanczak, a panel discussion on Cleveland’s Polish immigrant community will be held at Western Reserve Historical Society on Wednesday, March 19th, from 2 to 4 pm. Participating in the discussion will be Gene Bak, Mary Erdmans, John Grabowski, and Sean Martin. This panel discussion will examine the long history of Cleveland’s Polish immigrant community, with particular emphasis on the post-war migration of individuals like Julian Stanczak who came to play major roles in art and culture within and outside of that community. This is a free event. For more information on Stanczak, including details of current exhibitions, see http://www.siegallifelonglearning.org/stanczak-programs.html

 

November 11th Reception at the Polish-American Cultural Center

Saturday, November 5th, 2011

The Polish-American Cultural Center invites anyone interested in Polish culture to a reception celebrating Poland’s Independence Day on Friday, November 11th, at 7:00 PM. The reception also marks the opening of the exhibit “Contemporary Poland”. The Center is located in the heart of Cleveland’s Slavic Village neighborhood, at 6501 Lansing Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44105. Free parking is across the street.

Queen of Parade Ball

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

Queen of Parade Ball
Organized by
POLISH CONSTITUTION DAY OBSERVANCE COMMITTEE
WARSZAWA DISTRICT

Saturday, May 1, 2010
PRCUA Auditorium—6966 Broadway Avenue, Cleveland

7pm—Ball
Queen of parade will be chosen

Music by:
Ptaki Orkiestra & Dj Malutki

Donation $10.00

Food & Beverages will be available

For more information/reservations please call – (216) 883-3131
Table reservations call: (216) 849-1292

http://www.polishconstitutionday.com/

Dr. Jerzy J. Maciuszko – Ambassador of Polish Culture

Sunday, October 4th, 2009

From Plain Dealer:

http://blog.cleveland.com/poland/2008/04/dr_jerzy_maciuszko_the_most_se.html

From “Saving Private Ryan” to “Inglourious Basterds”, there have been plenty of tales told in our popular culture about the exploits of World War II soldiers, as portrayed by stars such as Tom Hanks and Brad Pitt. Much less well-known is the story of a humble Northeast Ohio witness to the very start of the Second World War, seventy years ago. 96-year-old Jerzy Maciuszko recently shared some of his harrowing experiences with ideastream®’s David C. Barnett, who has produced a sound portrait that captures the fear along the front lines and the joy of playing violin in a prisoner-of-war orchestra.

http://www.wcpn.org/WCPN/news/28051/

Polish class at CSU

Saturday, August 15th, 2009

Cleveland State University is offering a new course this fall

BEGINNING POLISH – The best part – for anyone 60 years of age or older – IT’S FREE (more…)

Gene Bak award celebration continued with the roar of a Tiger

Tuesday, May 1st, 2007

After Eugene Bak was presented with the Knights Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland on April 20th, his two sons celebrated with him by taking him on a spring golf tour.  The festivities started with a day at Firestone Country Club on Sunday and then moved on Monday to Oakmont Country Club in Pittsburgh, the site of the 2007 U.S. Open Championship.  The event at Oakmont was sponsored by American Express and was set up to provide avid golfers with an opportunity to preview the 18 holes that contain more than 300 bunkers before the professionals arrive for the U.S. Open in June. After an enjoyable round, the group of 80 golfers settled in for a lunch.  During the lunch, a presentation was made by American Express and a number of celebrities were introduced.  First was Robin Roberts from Good Morning America and then Mike Tirico from ESPN and Monday Night Football.  Finally the President of American Express announced we were to experience a very special treat, and in walked Tiger Woods.  The very special treat was that Tiger was about to play a practice round at Oakmont and the 80 golfers attending the event were to walk the course with him.

We all embarked onto the first hole where Tiger displayed a completely different side of him.  Normally, all business, he portrayed a light hearted side, cracking jokes and interacting with the small gallery.  He started off with a 350 yard drive with a follow up comment “That will work”  Each hole was a mini-clinic, as Tiger explained his strategy from tee to green and how he intended to hit the next shot. It was amazing to see Tiger hit within five feet of his intended target on almost every hole.

When we reached Oakmont’s famous row of church-pew bunkers between the third and fourth fairways, someone asked if he would demonstrate how to hit a shot out of them. He refused. “Why bring negativity into your thoughts,” he said, adding he only practiced from places he intended to play.  Gene asked Tiger “How do you deal with the noise and distraction of the fans” to which Tiger responded “What noise.”
On the 484-yard final hole, into the wind, he hit his approach with a five-wood: “This is my senior club,” he said. “When you turn 30 you get a five-wood, when you turn 40 you get at seven-wood, when you turn 50 you get a nine-wood.”  Gene has taken this advice and is in search of an eleven-wood.

The evening culminated with an awards dinner, where Gene Bak received yet another award, second place in the net score competition.  Gene accepted his glass cup trophy and of course made sure his sons felt the humility of having the old guy beat them.

Although the Tiger appearance was icing on the celebratory cake, the opportunity to unite the Bak boys, who only get together about once per year, was the true gift to Gene.

Mark Bak

My introduction to the Polish American Cultural Center

Monday, March 5th, 2007

My introduction to the Polish American Cultural Center came in the form of an exhibition opening.  As part of my job, coordinator of the SPACES World Artists Program at SPACES gallery, I was hosting Polish artist Roman Dziadkiewicz.  I wanted Roman to learn about Cleveland and to better understand what it means to be part of a Polish community in the United States. Also, he had been forced to speak and write in English for weeks, and we both needed some help. Roman and I were warmly welcomed to the opening of the Polish-Hungarian exhibition, documenting the relationship between the two peoples over many, many years. While Roman found solace in other Polish artists, I was moved by the openness of the Polish Center to welcome another community through its doors. (more…)

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Warsaw

Thursday, March 1st, 2007

A winter walk in Warsaw. Actually, a visit to just one site, but an important one – Plac Józef Piłsudski, or Józef Piłsudski Square.

A colonnade, damaged during the war, rises from the square, a fragment of the fomer Saski Palace. An eternal flame and an honor guard of soldiers stands before it. Every Pole knows that this is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
For several years there has been a custom that young couples come here after their wedding to place their bouquets as an offering to the Unknown Soldier. Such a beautiful patriotic gesture to begin their new lives. (more…)

Growing up Polish

Monday, March 1st, 2004

We refer to ourselves as Americans of Polish origin.  My sister and I were born in the United States, whereas our older brother was born in Belgium where our parents had completed their university studies after the Second World War.  We not only grew up speaking Polish at home, our parents taught us to read and write Polish before we started (American) kindergarten.  However, we were more than just bilingual, we were brought up bicultural as well.  Has this hurt us at all?  Have there been any negative repercussions associated with this?  Absolutely not!

As adults, we realized that our parents had been enlightened people who knew that by virtue of being raised in this country, we would be Americans in every sense of the word and that we would speak like everyone else.  However, they also knew that giving us a second language would enrich our lives and broaden our horizons.

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